Infectious Diseases 2020

Infectious Diseases 2020

Salmonellosis - Annual Epidemiological Report for 2017

ECDC 31 January, 2020

Salmonellosis is the second most commonly reported gastrointestinal infection and an important cause of foodborne outbreaks in the EU/EEA. In 2017, 92,649 laboratory-confirmed cases were reported of which 156 were fatal. The EU/EEA notification rate was 19.6 cases per 100,000 population. The highest notification rates were reported by the Czech Republic (108.5 cases per 100,000 population) and Slovakia (106.5), followed by Hungary and Lithuania. The lowest rate was reported by Portugal. The largest increase in rates from 2016–2017 was observed in Iceland (62%), Ireland (25%) and Portugal (23%).
The highest notification rate of salmonellosis was observed among young children 0–4 years, with 94.1 cases per 100,000 population. The rate in young children was almost three times higher than in older children and eight times as high as in adults 25–64 years. 
In 2017, Salmonella was the most common cause of foodborne outbreaks, accounting for 24% (1,241) of all reported foodborne outbreaks. Eggs and egg products continued to be the most commonly identified vehicles in these outbreaks. In the two largest multi-country outbreaks investigated in 2017, eggs were either confirmed or suspected to be the source. The multi-country outbreak of S. Enteritidis associated with contaminated eggs from Poland identified in 2016.continued in 2017. By 28 November 2017, an additional 196 WGS-confirmed and 72 probable cases (based on MLVA type) had been reported by eight EU/EEA countries since February 2017, adding to the 340 WGS-confirmed and 374 probable cases reported by 16 EU/EEA countries in 2016 and 2015. Just as in 2016, the peak in cases was in September.
A multi-country outbreak of infections with S. Enteritidis phage types 56 and 62, MLVA profile 2-11-3-3-2 and 2-12-3-3-2, delineated through WGS analysis, was identified in 2017 with historical cases dating back to 2014. Five Member States reported 314 confirmed cases in 2017 and four other EU/EEA countries reported historical isolates, all clustering in three closely related 5-SNP single linkage clusters. Investigations by Public Health England showed that the outbreaks could be associated with the consumption of poultry products, i.e. meat or eggs. A large proportion of cases with known travel history during the incubation period had travelled to Spain and the second most commonly visited country was Portugal.

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