What's New ? - 2019

What's New ? - 2019

The meat alternative market

15 June, 2019

By 2040, most "meat" will come from alternative sources and not livestock. That's according to a report led by AT Kearney, a global consultancy firm. The basic conclusion, is that 60 percent of "meat" eaten in two decades' time will be either lab-grown (35 percent) or plant-based (25 percent). 
Alternative "meats" range from traditional meat substitutes (tofu, seitan, mushrooms, and jackfruit) to insect protein (mostly mealworms and crickets) to novel vegan meat replacements, which use hemoglobin and binders to imitate the sensory profile of meat. Cultured meat (aka clean meat, cell-based meat, and slaughter-free meat) is newer to the scene and – at least for the time being – more exclusive, costing $80 per 100 grams as of 2018. It is grown in a lab and only requires a single cell extracted from a living animal, but the end product is identical to conventionally produced meat.
As of 2018, the combined market for plant-based meat alternatives stood at $4.6 billion. That's projected to grow 20-30 percent per annum for the next several years. Cultured meat, on the other hand, is not currently commercially available and is only just starting the process of being accepted by global food regulators, with the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) agreeing to regulate cultured meat jointly for the first time last year. Nonetheless, the report's authors predict cultured meat will win out in the long-run, securing 35 percent of the market by 2040. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) estimates close to half (46 percent) of the world's harvest is dedicated to livestock feed. As well as being cruelty-free, they offer advantages as far as product design goes (you could replace fatty acids with omega, for example) and have lower Salmonella or E.coli risks, unlike conventional meat, and production does not require large-scale use of antibiotics, a contributing factor to antibiotic resistance.