Infectious Diseases 2019

Infectious Diseases 2019

Norway: Campylobacter risk factors in broilers

1 October, 2019

Campylobacteriosis is currently the most commonly reported bacterial infectious disease in the Norwegian human population. In almost half of the cases, the infection is acquired in Norway. Consumption of poultry meat purchased raw has been identified as a significant risk factor in Norway, together with drinking un-disinfected water, eating at barbecues, occupational exposure to animals, and eating undercooked pork. A study in 2018 on broiler flocks older than 50 days of age at slaughter, showed that 43.3% of the flocks tested positive for Campylobacter jejuni when sampled at slaughter. Caecal material from 104 broiler flocks slaughtered at three different slaughterhouses during the period May through October was tested by cultivation. Campylobacter jejuni was the only Campylobacter sp. detected. The flocks from the slaughterhouse with the oldest flocks had the highest prevalence of Campylobacter sp. (87.5%). These flocks did also have outdoor access. The flocks from the slaughterhouse with the youngest flocks did not have outdoor access and had the lowest prevalence (22.2%) of Campylobacter sp. The number of samples in the study is too low to draw wide conclusions, but the results indicate age and outdoor access as important risk factors. This is in accordance with results from other studies.