Infectious Diseases 2019

Infectious Diseases 2019

Salmonellosis outbreaks in the USA, 1998 to 2015

Snyder et al (2019) Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 82, No. 7, 2019, Pages 1191–1199 20 July, 2019

Salmonella is a major cause of foodborne illness in the United States. A group of researchers from Pennsylvania, USA obtained data for salmonellosis outbreaks from 1998 to 2015 that were submitted by public health jurisdictions to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System. In total, 2,447 outbreaks (yearly average, 136) with a confirmed or suspected etiology of nontyphoidal Salmonella were identified. The outbreaks included 65,916 individual cases (mean, 27 cases per outbreak). Food vehicles were identified in 49% of the outbreaks. Frequently implicated foods included eggs (12.5%), chicken (12.4%), and pork (6.5%). Fifty-five (2.2%) outbreaks had fatalities; 87 (0.1%) individuals died. Of those outbreaks with a reported serotype, the most commonly identified were Enteritidis (29.1%), Typhimurium (12.6%), and Newport (7.6%). Serotypes with a statistically significant increase over time included Braenderup and I 4,[5],12:i:-. Some serotypes were commonly associated with outbreaks due to certain food vehicles; 81% of outbreaks due to eggs were associated with serotype Enteritidis. Food commodities that were most commonly associated with multistate outbreaks were nuts and seeds, sprouts, and fruits. Outbreaks occurred most frequently in summer. States with the highest number of salmonellosis outbreaks per 100,000 population were Alaska (0.137) and Minnesota (0.121); states with the lowest were Delaware (,0.001) and Wyoming (,0.001). The highest number of salmonellosis cases per 100,000 population were in Washington, DC (4.786) and Arkansas (3.857).