Infectious Diseases 2019

Infectious Diseases 2019

Salmonellosis: Annual epidemiological report for 2016

27 March, 2019

This report is based on data for 2016 retrieved from The European Surveillance System (TESSy) on 15 March 2018. Salmonellosis is the second most commonly reported gastrointestinal infection and an important causeof foodborne outbreaks in the EU/EEA.
• In 2016, 95,326 laboratory-confirmed cases were reported out of which 134 were fatal.
• The EU/EEA notification rate was 20.4 cases per 100,000 population.
• Salmonellosis notification rates have stabilised in the last five years after a long period that was marked by a declining trend.
• The reported case rate was highest in young children 0−4 years with 89.9 cases per 100,000 population, seven times higher than in adults 25–64 years.
Salmonellosis remains the second most common zoonosis in humans in the EU/EEA and the significant decrease observed from 2004–2013 appears to have levelled off in recent years. In 2016, Salmonella was the most common cause of foodborne outbreaks, accounting for 22% of all reported foodborne outbreaks (1,067).
Eggs and egg products continued to be the most commonly identified vehicles in these outbreaks and were also the source in the large multi-country outbreak linked to eggs from Poland. In 2016, Poland reported 26 breeding flocks of Gallus gallus (1.4%) and 169 laying hen flocks (7.2%) positive for S. Enteritidis, which was by far the highest proportions of S. Enteritidis-positive flocks in the EU. The large egg outbreak affected at least 14 EU/EEA countries and possibly even more since the outbreak case definition was based on typing methods (WGS and MLVA) not yet applied in all countries. The fact that the salmonellosis rate in young children is seven times higher compared with adults may be explained by a higher proportion of symptomatic infections among young children, an increased likelihood for parents to take children to see a doctor and for doctors to take samples.

Related Links
Link The Full Report