Infectious Diseases 2019

Infectious Diseases 2019

UK: Zoonoses Report

19 January, 2019

This year’s UK Zoonoses Report continues to include the numbers of reported cases of zoonotic infection in humans and animals and a selection of feature articles which highlight human and animal incidents and issues of public health significance which occurred during 2017. Campylobacter continues to be the most commonly reported human gastrointestinal pathogen and cases increased again in 2017 after a decline over the previous 2 years. The reporting rate for campylobacter increased in the UK from 89.8 per 100,000 population in 2016 to 96.8 per 100,000 in 2017. This increase was observed in each of the UK countries. Northern Ireland continues to report rates lower than the rest of the United Kingdom (76.0 cases per 100,000 population). the ratio of unreported human campylobacter disease to reports to national surveillance is 9.3 to 1 (95% CI 6-14.4). This suggests that, in 2017, there were almost 600,000 (with 95% CI, 383,676 – 920,822) cases in the UK. In 2017, there were 9 foodborne outbreaks of campylobacteriosis reported in the UK, compared to 8 recorded in 2016. Seven outbreaks were associated with the consumption of poultry meat products, of which 6 were chicken or duck liver parfait or pate. Two outbreaks were associated with the consumption of raw drinking milk.
In 2017, 10,089 cases of laboratory confirmed salmonellosis were reported in the UK. For every laboratory confirmed report of disease made to national surveillance schemes, there are estimated to be 4.7 cases in the community. This suggests the total number of cases in the UK in 2017 was approximately 47,000. Salmonella Enteritidis remained the most commonly reported serovar in 2017, accounting for 27% of cases. Overall, in 2017 there was a small decrease in reports in the UK, across all countries other than England where a small increase was reported. Salmonella Typhimurium (including monophasic strains) was the second most commonly reported serovar, comprising 21% of cases, and increased by 10% from 2016. Thirteen foodborne salmonella outbreaks were reported in the UK in 2017, compared to 12 in 2016. Two were caused by S. Enteritidis, 5 by S. Typhimurium and the remainder by S. Adjame, S. Agona, S. Chester, S. Give, S. Infantis and S. Stanley. Eggs were implicated as the source in 2 outbreaks (both S. Enteritidis), and pork products in an additional 2 (both monophasic S. Typhimurium).
Results from the UK Salmonella NCPs in chickens and turkeys: 
- in 2017, no regulated serovars were isolated from adult breeding chicken flocks (0% prevalence), this gives an overall prevalence of 0% UK breeding chicken flocks testing positive for the regulated Salmonella serovars.
-out of the total 4,428 laying hen flocks included during the year, 6 adult flocks werepositive for S. Enteritidis, giving an overall prevalence of 0.1%
- the prevalence of the target serovars in broiler flocks was 0.01% in 2017. Three broiler flocks were detected positive for monophasic S. Typhimurium, and 2 flockspositive for S. Typhimurium out of a total of approximately 53,174 flocks tested during the year
- no regulated serovars were isolated from breeding turkey flocks (0% prevalence),whilst the prevalence in fattening turkey flocks was 0.3% (7/2578 flocks) - 4 fattening flocks tested positive for S. Enteritidis and 3 for monophasic S. Typhimurium

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