Infectious Diseases 2018

Infectious Diseases 2018

UK: Antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter from retail chilled chicken

15 January, 2018

The development and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a public health concern worldwide.  The use of antibiotics is important in treating infections and preventing disease from arising in both animals and humans.  However, the overuse and/or misuse of antibiotics in both animal husbandry and healthcare settings has been linked to the emergence and spread of microorganisms which are resistant to them, rendering treatment ineffective and posing a risk to public health.
A Microbiological Survey of Campylobacter Contamination in Fresh Whole UK Produced Chilled Chickens at Retail Sale (2015-16), presents antimicrobial resistance data for a subset of those Campylobacter isolates collected as part of this survey.  The isolates were obtainedfrom chicken at retail sale during the period from July 2015 to May 2016.Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli isolates (548) recovered from retail chicken. Ciprofloxacin resistance was identified in around half of the C. jejuni isolates (437 and C. coli isolates (108) tested. None of the C. jejuni and only 1.9 % of the C. coli isolates were resistant to erythromycin and just over three quarters of isolates were resistant to tetracycline. All isolates tested were sensitive to gentamicin. Multidrug resistance defined as reduced susceptibility to at least three antimicrobial classes was found in 1.5 % of all isolates examined. The proportion of multi-resistant isolates was significantly higher within C. coli (7.4 %) compared to within C. jejuni. Overall, the proportions of antimicrobial resistant isolates found in this study were similar to that reported in the previous survey year (2014-2015) with erythromycin resistance continuing a decreasing trend. Multi drug resistance (MDR) in C. coli was lower compared to that found in the previous survey year. MDR in C. jejuni was not detected and thus likely to be very low as reported in the dataset from the first survey year (1 %). However, the data demonstrated significantly higher proportions of ciprofloxacin resistance compared to older data from the 2007/2008 FSA survey.

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