Infectious Diseases 2017

Infectious Diseases 2017

WHO: stop using antibiotics in healthy animals

The Lancet Planetary Health Available online 7 November 2017 8 November, 2017

A new report that includes a systematic review of 179 studies, commissioned by the WHO and published in The Lancet Planetary Health, found that interventions to reduce antibiotic use in food-producing animals decreased drug-resistant bacteria in animals by approximately 15% and multidrug-resistant bacteria by 24% to 32%.
A smaller body of evidence suggests a similar association in the studied human populations, particularly those with direct exposure to food-producing animals. The implications for the general human population are less clear, given the low number of studies.
The overall findings have directly informed the development of WHO guidelines on the use of antibiotics in food-producing animals. The WHO said the evidence also indicates that broad restrictions on all antibiotic classes is more effective in reducing antibiotic resistance than narrow restrictions on particular drugs.
WHO Recommendation 1:
Overall antimicrobial use: We recommend an overall reduction in use of all classes of medically important antimicrobials in food-producing animals.
WHO recommendation 2:
Growth promotion use: We recommend complete restriction of use of all classes of medically important antimicrobials in food-producing animals for growth promotion.
WHO Recommendation 3:
Prevention use (in the absence of disease): We recommend complete restriction of use of all classes of medically important antimicrobials in food-producing animals for prevention of infectious diseases that have not yet been clinically diagnosed.
WHO Recommendation(s) 4: Control and treatment use (in the presence of disease):
Recommendation 4a: We suggest that antimicrobials classified as critically important for human medicine should not be used for control of the dissemination of a clinically diagnosed infectious disease identified within a group of food-producing animals.
Recommendation 4b: We suggest that antimicrobials classified as highest priority critically important for human medicine should not be used for treatment of food-producing animals with a clinically diagnosed infectious disease.
Best practice statement 1 - Any new class of antimicrobials or new antimicrobial combination developed for use in humans will be considered critically important for human medicine unless categorized otherwise by WHO.
Best practice statement 2 - Medically important antimicrobials that are not currently used in food production should not be used in the future in food production including in food-producing animals or plants.

Related Links
Link WHO guidelines