Infectious Diseases 2017

Infectious Diseases 2017

Campylobacter infections in Germany, 2011–2014

Scientific Reports | 7: 5139 13 July, 2017

Intestinal Campylobacter infections are the most frequently reported bacterial infections in Germany and in other European countries. Epidemiological studies conducted in several European and non-European countries have identified the consumption of poultry or chicken meat as an important risk factor for campylobacteriosis, and in source attribution studies outside of Germany about 50–90% of human infections were attributed to chicken.
Researchers from Germany  performed a large combined case-control and source attribution study (Nov 2011-Feb 2014) to identify risk factors for sporadic intestinal Campylobacter infections and to determine the relative importance of various animal sources for human infections in Germany. Consumption of chicken meat and eating out were the most important risk factors for Campylobacter infections. Additional risk factors were preparation of poultry meat in the household; preparation of uncooked food and raw meat at the same time; contact with poultry animals; and the use of gastric acid inhibitors. The mean probability of human C. jejuni isolates to originate from chickens was highest (74%, whereas pigs were a negligible source for C. jejuni infections. Human C. coli isolates were likely to originate from chickens (56%) or from pigs (32%).